Spring Design For Journalism Section 2

Some simple Photoshop tips

Posted in Uncategorized by cmlenton on February 4, 2010

Simple steps to … Basic Photo Editing using Photoshop

Open
1. Double-click on Photoshop to open up the program.
2. Go to the FILE menu.
3. Click on OPEN.
4. Find the image with which you plan to work.
5. Highlight the image file.
6. Click on OPEN.

*A shortcut is to find the image with which you plan to work and drag it into Photoshop.

Rotate
Sometimes a digital photograph needs to be rotated when a photographer accidentally tilted the camera when taking the picture. Other times an image needs to be rotated when it was scanned in at an angle.

1. Go to the IMAGE menu.
2. Choose ROTATE CANVAS.

*You can rotate the canvas 90 degrees in a CW (clockwise) or CCW (counter-clockwise) direction. You may also rotate the canvas 180 degrees.

*You may also rotate the canvas in increments other than 90 degrees by choosing ARBITRARY.

3. Choose either 180, 90 CW, 90 CCW or ARBITRARY, depending on the photograph.
4. If you choose ARBITRARY, enter a number between 0 and 360, including fractions, such as .5.

*When eyeing up an image to determine how it needs to be rotated, see if there is a line in the picture that should be standing straight vertically or horizontally. If you rotate according to that line, you will know that the picture has been straightened out.

*You may have to rotate an image a few times to get the proper rotation.

Crop
Very rarely do photographers use the full, original frame they shot as their final image. Oftentimes, especially when a beginner is behind the camera, a frame will have wasted space that takes away from the strongest part of a photo. There is always a stronger photo within a photo, and to make a photo as strong as it can be, we crop.

1. Select the CROP tool, which is represented by a crosshatch on the left-hand side of your toolbar.
2. Below the Photoshop menu, which is the menu at the very top of your screen, you will find your Options menu, where all the settings for the tool you select will appear. Delete any number that you find in the WIDTH and HEIGHT boxes on the Options menu.

*By typing a number in the WIDTH and HEIGHT boxes, you are telling the CROP tool to crop your image to this exact size.

3. Using the CROP tool, click on your image and drag it diagonally outward.

*When you let go, you will see dashed lines with handles.

4. Move the handles, which are the miniature squares on the corners of the photograph, until you’ve selected the area of the photo that you want to keep.

*You can also rotate an image using the CROP tool. To rotate, move the cursor below the handles and manually turn the image.

5. Double-click the document, inside of the area you plan to keep, to activate the crop.

Color Correction

LEVELS
1. Click the IMAGE menu on top of the screen.
2. Scroll down to ADJUSTMENTS.
3. Select the LEVELS option from the second drop-down menu.
4. From here, you can adjust your levels (by moving the middle gray arrow either left or right. You can select a specific color from the drop down menu above the chart in the LEVELS box as well.)
5. The colors are interrelated so adding more of one color diminishes the amount of the other two colors. So keep that in mind while you’re adjusting.
6. When the LEVELS are how you like them, click OK.

Sharpen
Every photo needs to be sharpened. Sharpening increases the contrast between neighboring pixels. It will make an image’s subject(s) stand out.

1. Go to the Photoshop menu and click FILTER.
2. Select SHARPEN.
3. Click on UNSHARP MASK.
4. Choose an AMOUNT to sharpen your photo.

*AMOUNT controls the amount of sharpening that is applied to the image. Values over 100 % increase the sharpness. Values under 100% decrease the sharpness.

5. Choose a RADIUS to sharpen.

*RADIUS controls the width of the edges that are sharpened.

6. Select your THRESHOLD.

*THRESHOLD controls the noise, also known as graininess, that is introduces in the sharpening process. A threshold of 0 means that all the pixels will be the most sharpened, which will produce more noise. Try to stick to a threshold level of between 1 and 10.

Save for Print
A photograph saved for print must be larger and less compressed so that it will print at the highest of quality, with more pixels per inch.

1. Go to the Photoshop menu and select IMAGE.
2. Click on IMAGE SIZE.
3. In the RESOLUTION box, type in 200, which will save the image as 200 pixels per inch.
4. If your image is a HORIZONTAL, set the WIDTH at 7 inches. If your image is a VERTICAL, set the HEIGHT at 7 inches.
5. Click OK.
6. Go to the FILE menu.
7. Select SAVE AS.
8. Choose a destination for your photo at the top of the SAVE AS menu.
9. Choose a name for your photo in the SAVE AS dropdown box.
10. Choose JPEG in the FORMAT box.
11. Click SAVE.
12. When the JPEG OPTIONS box pops up, set the image quality at HIGH, or 12 on the scale of 0 to 12.

Save for Web
A photograph saved for the Web must be smaller and more compressed than one saved for print in order for it to properly load in a browser.

1. Go to the Photoshop menu and click on IMAGE.
2. Select IMAGE SIZE.
3. Find the RESOLUTION box, and type in 72, which will save the image as 72 pixels per inch.
4. Click OK.
5. Go the FILE menu.
6. Select SAVE AS.
7. Choose a destination for your photo at the top of the SAVE AS menu.
8. Choose a name for your photo in the SAVE AS dropdown box.
9. Choose JPEG in the FORMAT box.
10. Click SAVE.
11. When the JPEG OPTIONS box pops up, set the image quality at MEDIUM, or 6 on the scale of 0 to 12.
12. Hit OK.

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